Not content with being one of the most economically strongest cities in the United States, with a newly-introduced minimum wage that allows its residents to be able to live without fear of not being able to afford basic necessities, Seattle has once again outdone itself with the introduction of the Marry Me in Seattle campaign, a fantastic initiative for LGBT folk looking to tie the knot that has been concocted by the Visit Seattle team that comes off the back of a hugely successful Pride campaign.

 

So, what’s the campaign all about? Engaged couples can enter a sweepstakes to have an all-expenses paid wedding in the city, and have their wedding officiated by Ed Murray, the first openly gay mayor in Seattle. The Visit Seattle team will be awarding wedding ceremonies to four lucky couples, who will have everything from flights, meals, hotels, and even the wedding DJ included for free in their big day. A great way to attract LGBT visitors to the city, the Marry Me in Seattle campaign highlights the Emerald City as a warm, open and progressive destination that LGBT folk can head to on vacation and feel safe and welcome.

 

Washington state’s marriage equality law, which was passed by popular vote in November 2012, has seen an increase in LGBT tourism to Seattle and the state itself, and the new campaign is sure to make the city even more popular as a gay destination. So, if you live in the United States and are engaged to your partner, but worried about being able to afford the big day itself – well, how about entering the sweepstakes for the chance to have everything covered for you, in what is sure to be a day that you’ll look back on fondly. Seattle, you’re doing LGBT tourism right – it’s not all about designer brands and washboard abs. Treating LGBT folk like everyday people who have the same goals as everyone else is the way forward, and the Marry Me in Seattle campaign is a perfect example of a tourism board that knows the audience that they’re trying to attract. Confetti for everyone!

 

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